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Electronic and Photonic Molecular Materials Group

department of physics and astronomy

Michael Stringer

Photo of Michael Stringer (left).

Biography

Michael is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher under the supervision of Prof David Lidzey in the EPMM group at the University of Sheffield. He also completed his PhD in the EPMM group and was part of a wider EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training across seven universities, for New and Sustainable Photovoltaics. His thesis was titled 'Optimisation of Fabrication Processes for Stable and Scalable Perovskite Solar Cells' which entailed the implementation of alternative charge transport materials for perovskite solar cells and encapsulation of perovskite solar cells.

He aims to maintain a broad understanding of emergent photovoltaic technologies, with a more particular focus on techniques to scale up the production of high efficiency functional devices. He is currently employed through a collaboration contract between the University of Sheffield and Power Roll, and is helping Power Roll develop their exciting new photovoltaic back-contact substrate system, based on flexible polymeric grooves filled with a perovskite absorbing layer.

Michael completed his four-year MPhys in Physics and Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield, graduating with a second-class division one with honours.

In combination with a previously nurtured interest in flexible organic displays from a graphical design project he completed as a summer project many years ago, the masters project he completed on computational polymer physics (using C++ and CUDA) spurred Michael to choose a focus in organic and inorganic semiconductor physics within the EPMM group.

In his spare time Michael enjoys playing squash, being a dedicated Instagram husband, cooking good food, traveling for good food and eating even more good food.

 
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